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Inflammations
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Acute & Chronic Inflammations – How dangerous can they be?

 

Inflammation is a natural defense mechanism of the human body. It represents a process by which the white blood cells and the various molecules they produce, defend the human body from potentially harmful microbes such as bacteria, viruses and protozoa.

 

Symptoms of inflammation

The first stage of inflammation is often called irritation, which then becomes inflammation. Inflammation is accompanied by the appearance of pus. The healing stage then follows and new tissue is formed in the wound. If the inflammation occurs deep inside the body, as in an internal organ, the symptoms may not be directly evident.

The symptoms of inflammation vary depending on whether the reaction is acute or chronic.

 

Acute inflammation

An acute inflammation is one that starts quickly and can become severe in a short time. Signs and symptoms usually only last for a few days, but may persist for a few weeks in some cases.

Examples of diseases or conditions that can lead to acute inflammation include: acute bronchitis, sore throat from cold or flu, acute appendicitis, dermatitis, tonsillitis, sinusitis or a physical trauma.

Symptoms of acute inflammation may include: Pain, Redness, Stiffness, Swelling, Fever.

 

Chronic Inflammation

When the acute inflammation does not subside then it becomes chronic and the body remains in a state of emergency. In the long run, chronic inflammation has a negative effect on tissues and organs. Research has shown that chronic inflammation is responsible for a number of conditions and health problems, such as certain types of cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, periodontitis and allergic rhinitis.

The symptoms of chronic inflammation are presented in different ways. These may include: fatigue, sores in the mouth, chest pain, abdominal pain, fever, rash, joint pain.

Examples of diseases and conditions that include chronic inflammation: bronchial asthma, chronic peptic ulcer, tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis, periodontitis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, active hepatitis and Autoimmune Diseases.

 

Causes of inflammation

Inflammation is caused by the body’s response to an injury or infection.

Inflammation does not necessarily mean microbial infection, but an infection can cause inflammation.

Unfortunately, in a defense system that lacks nutrients, the inability of the immune system to function properly and effectively can lead to the onset of Chronic and Autoimmune Diseases.

Some of the causes may be: lack of rehabilitation and care in acute inflammation such as infections and injuries, an Autoimmune Disease, long-term exposure to irritating conditions such as chemicals, environmental toxins and polluted air as well as severe organic causes, such as oxidation, hormonal imbalance, micronutrient deficiencies. Finally, many believe that there are additional factors that can cause chronic inflammation such as: Smoking, Obesity, Alcohol consumption, Chronic stress.

It should be noted that the above data do not cause chronic inflammation in everyone. In addition, some cases are not clear and require detailed and specialized tests.

 

Treatment of inflammatory conditions

Reducing inflammation is helpful, though not always necessary. Anti-inflammatory drugs are commonly used for this purpose, including naproxen, ibuprofen and aspirin. These drugs can have side effects, such as possible kidney damage and increase of the risk of stroke or heart attack.

The modern medical approach aims at the complete mapping and identification of impaired cellular mechanisms, in order to identify the “root” of the problem and thus amend any imbalances and disease mechanisms.

With hormonal balance, a diet with antioxidant foods and with the strengthening of the immune system with natural micronutrients, the chronic insidious inflammation can eventually be reversed and the defense system can be re-adjusted, in order to function properly.

Dr. Nikoleta Koini, M.D.

Doctor of Functional, Preventive, Anti-ageing and Restorative Medicine.
Diplomate and Board Certified in Anti-aging, Preventive, Functional and Regenerative Medicine from A4M (American Academy in Antiaging Medicine).

 

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